Graduate Courses

Listed below are detailed descriptions of the graduate courses. Some graduate courses listed are not offered every year. Students should check in the Sociology Department Office to find out which courses are available for each semester. If students have any questions concerning a particular course they should talk to their advisor or the course instructor.

Course Numbering System

100-299 Courses designed for freshman and sophomores.
300-499 Courses designed for juniors and seniors.
500-699 Courses designed primarily for juniors and seniors, but can also be taken by graduate students who have fewer than 30 hours of graduate credit.
700-799 Courses designed primarily for graduate students who have fewer than 30 hours of graduate credit, but can also be taken by undergraduates.
800-900 Courses designed primarily for graduate students who have fewer than 30 hours of graduate credit.

Required Courses

Sociology 810 Sociological Inquiry

The goals of this course are to understand the characteristics of sociologically interesting and rigorous research and to design a research proposal that shares those characteristics. Students will read books and articles representing a variety of research approaches (ethnographies, surveys, interviews, document analyses, historical studies, comparative research, etc.), and will analyze those approaches in order to understand their theoretical and methodological significance. Students will also distribute their proposals to the other students in the course for comment and critique. Assignments will include a research proposal such as a draft for an external grant proposal, M.A. thesis proposal for students at the M.A. level or a dissertation proposal draft for students at the Ph.D. level.

Sociology 811 Sociological Research

The use of the scientific method to study social phenomena including: the formulation and testing of hypotheses; techniques for collecting data; measuring social variables; interpreting research findings; the relationship of theory and facts.

Sociology 995 Professionalization Proseminar

The main objective of this course is to help students understand and deal with several "nuts and bolts" professional issues regarding the discipline of sociology and being a professional sociologist. This course is for advanced doctoral students who are close to being on the job market, whether they are pursuing academic or non-academic careers.

 

Sociological Theory

Sociology 802 Classical Social Theory

This seminar will focus on the later 19th and early 20th century “theories of society,” addressing the origins and developmental tendencies of Western modernity and their relation to premodern social orders. Primary texts of the major theorists (eg. Marx, Durkheim, Nietzsche, Weber, Simmel, and Mead) will be studied in historical context. The tradition’s analytical and critical resources and problematic features will also be explored. Finally, the connections between this tradition and contemporary sociological approaches will be explored.

Sociology 803 Issues in Contemporary Theory

A critical examination of recent trends and debates in sociological theory. This is a thematically oriented course in which classical as well as contemporary views will be explored. Attention will be directed to theoretical issues under discussion in fields such as symbolic interactionism, semiology, ethnomethodology, critical theory, macrosociology, and others.

Sociology 804 Sociology of Knowledge

Sociology of Knowledge examines how social forces, particularly social relations of inequality, shape the contours of knowledge and the privileging of some kinds of knowledge over others. Several paradigms within sociology have addressed this problematic but, particularly in recent decades, the most fruitful work has been done by feminist scholars. In this course we will read some of the “classics” in sociology of knowledge, feminist critiques of mainstream knowledge, and feminist perspectives on knowing and the known. Finally we will take a critical look at the social institutions organizing the production of knowledge in western sociology: the discipline and the academy.

Sociology 808 Feminist Theories

This course will explore and evaluate accounts of social structure, social processes, and consciousness developed in the feminist literature. We will review a range of theoretical arguments, including liberal, historical, materialist, psychoanalytic, cultural, and Black feminist theories. Some of the readings will focus on limitations and distortions within mainstream social theory; others will center on the development of alternative social theory using the standpoint of women as a point of departure.

Sociology 900 Seminar on Special Topics in Theory

Each seminar will explore problems of theory in sociology. Topic, instructor, and hours of credit will be announced in the Timetable. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics, and a student may take more than one topic.

 

Sociological Methods

Sociology 812 Analytic Methods in Sociology

Consideration of quantitative methods of analysis including both parametric and non-parametric techniques.

Sociology 910 Seminar in Special Topics in Methods

Each seminar will explore problems of methods in sociology. Topic, instructor, and hours of credit will be announced in the Timetable. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics, and a student may take more than one topic.

 

Susbstantive Seminars

Sociology 722 Sociology of Gender

This course will offer a range of sociological perspectives on the role of gender in society. The particular substantive focus will vary each semester to allow flexibility for in-depth analysis of gender relationships in such areas as politics, health and aging, and work.

Sociology 760 Social Inequality

A comprehensive review of the major theoretical and empirical approaches used in the study of institutionalized social inequality. Reference to the origins, forms, cultural and structural variations and their changes over time, consequences and ideologies of social inequality.

Sociology 767 Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Gerontology & Aging

A seminar coordinated by the Gerontology Program. The seminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (biology, health services, behavioral and social sciences,human services) perspective on aging. The seminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as ABSC 787, AMS 767, COMS 787, and PSYC 787.)

Sociology 780 Advanced Topics in Sociology

Topics will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor to allow flexibility for in-depth analysis of particular topics.

Sociology 820 Political Sociology

This course offers an overview of the different perspectives and key arguments comprising the field of political sociology, including both classical and contemporary readings. The issues studied in this field include the nature of power and the nature of the state, relations between state and society, and social movements, political organization and civic participation, political culture, voting behavior, comparative political systems, warfare, democracy and economic development, citizenship, nationalism, revolutions, and globalization.

Sociology 824 Health and Social Behavior

This course provides students with an analytic understanding of the organization, professional, and interpersonal behavior that characterizes contemporary health and health care. Emphasis is placed on examination and integration of conceptual frameworks theories, and research findings bearing on basic behavioral/managerial issues such as authority relations in health care settings, models of illness behavior and health services utilization, the impact of organizational structure on employee and client attitudes and behavior, and the culture of professional medicine in relation to patient care.

Sociology 875 Political Economy of Globalization

The course will acquaint students with recent developments in the global economy, including its impact on politics and society. Topics include theories of globalization, the role of the nation-state and international agencies in socioeconomic development, inequality from a global perspective, immigration and citizenship, globalization and democracy, and the rise of transnational social movements.

Sociology 920 Social Organizations

Each seminar will explore problems of social organization in sociology. Topic, instructor, and hours of credit will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics, and a student may take more than one topic.

Sociology 930 Comparative Studies

Each seminar will explore problems of comparative studies in sociology. Topic, instructor, and hours of credit will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics, and a student may take more than one topic.

Sociology 970 Social Conflict & Change

Each seminar will explore problems of social conflict and change in sociology. Topic, instructor, and hours of credit will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics, and a student may take more than one topic.

 


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